Antibiotic Resistance in Children with Recurrent or Complicated Urinary Tract Infection

  • Nidal S Younish Department of Pediatric Prince Hashem Hospital
  • K Qual Department of Pharmacology and Supply, Prince Hashem Hospital
  • T Al-Awaisheh Department of Pediatric Prince Hashem Hospital
  • F Al-Awaisheh Department of Pediatric Prince Hashem Hospital
  • D Al-Kayed Department of Pharmacology and Supply, Prince Hashem Hospital

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Urinary tract infection is certainly one of the most common childhood infections. Emerging resistance to the antibiotics is not unusual. Current hospitalization for children with urinary tract infection is reserved for severe or complicated cases. The aim of the present study was to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern among children with recurrent or complicated urinary tract infection.

METHODS:

A retrospective study carried out at Prince Hashem hospital, Zarqa city, eastern Jordan and involved 336 episodes of culture proved urinary tract infection obtained from 121 patients with recurrent UTI, who used prophylactic antibiotics during the period from April 1, 2004 to December 31, 2006. The isolated microorganisms and there antibiotics susceptibility were studied.

RESULTS:

Seventy three patients (60.3%) were found to have some forms of urinary tract anomaly, significantly more prevalent among male children P<0.001. Vesicoureteral reflux being the most common (58.9%). Renal scars were significantly more prevalent among those with complicated rather than recurrent urinary tract infection (64.3% vs. 16.6%, P<0.001). Gram negative organisms were the most frequent isolates in patients with recurrent and complicated urinary tract infection. Proteus, Pseudomonas and Candida spp. were more prevalent in patients with complicated (P<0.001), and isolates in patients with UTA were significantly more resistant to most antibiotics tested.

CONCLUSIONS:

Pediatric urine culture isolates are becoming increasingly resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Empirical treatment with Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) or Cephalexin as the initial drug is ineffective. Nitrofurantoin and Nalidixic acid can be considered as the first line antibiotics for prophylaxis and or treatment of patients with recurrent UTI, while Meropenam and Ciprofloxacin can be used empirically in treating patients with complicated UTI.

Key words: Antibiotic resistance, Complicated, Recurrent, Urinary tract infection

Published
2009-01-01
How to Cite
Younish, N. S., Qual, K., Al-Awaisheh, T., Al-Awaisheh, F., & Al-Kayed, D. (2009). Antibiotic Resistance in Children with Recurrent or Complicated Urinary Tract Infection. Journal of Nepal Medical Association, 48(173). https://doi.org/10.31729/jnma.183
Section
Original Article