Estimation of Physiological Cost Index as an Energy Expenditure Index using MacGregor’s Equation

  • Binaya SJB Rana Department of Clinical Physiology, Maharajgunj Medical Campus, Institute of Medicine, Tribhuvan University.
  • Matiram Pun Department of Clinical Physiology, Maharajgunj Medical Campus, Institute of Medicine, Tribhuvan University.
Keywords: energy expenditure index; exercise; physiological cost index

Abstract

Introduction: Physical activity and energy expenditure can be quantified by measuring heart rate, oxygen uptake and respiratory quotient. The Physiological Cost Index (PCI) proposed by MacGregor is a simple and straightforward method to estimate the energy expenditure index. Here, we aim to estimate the energy expenditure among young Asian population using MacGregor’s equation. 

Methods: A total of 50 young randomly selected healthy females performed 50m, 100m and 150m walking test at their self-selected preferred speed. The physiological cost index values for 100 m walk at speeds slower and faster than the preferred speed were also obtained. The physiological cost index during exercise was calculated using MacGregor’s equation considering heart rate and speed of walking over the varying distances. 

Results: The PCI values on three different distances are consistent during self selected preferred speed. The PCI estimation on second and third tests for all three distances walked consistently reproducible. However for each distance walked, the first test the PCI was significantly higher than the second and third test values. The PCI values increased significantly when subjects walked either slower (p = 0.02) or faster (p = 0.001) than their normal preferred speed. 

Conclusion: The physiological cost index values were similar for varying distances walks. The PCI was the least at the preferred speed of walking and increased when the subjects either walked slower or faster than the preferred speed. The first estimation was higher than subsequent estimations. 

Keywords: energy expenditure index; exercise; physiological cost index. | PubMed

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Published
2015-09-30
How to Cite
Rana, B. S., & Pun, M. (2015). Estimation of Physiological Cost Index as an Energy Expenditure Index using MacGregor’s Equation. Journal of Nepal Medical Association, 53(199), 174-179. https://doi.org/10.31729/jnma.2786
Section
Original Article