Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome following Gastrointestinal Surgery

  • Udaya Koirala Department of Surgery, Kathmandu Model Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Prabin Bikram Thapa Department of Surgery, Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Mukunda Raj Joshi Department of Surgery, Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Deepak Raj Singh Department of Surgery, Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Sunil Kumar Sharma Department of Surgery, Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal

Abstract

Introduction: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome symptoms immediately after surgery have lately been regarded as potential warnings of impending post-operative complications and multiple organ failure. This study was conducted to find out the clinical significance of systemic inflammatory response syndrome in postoperative patients and to investigate the relationship between the duration of post-operative systemic inflammatory response syndrome and the post-operative morbidity and mortality.
Methods: Total 30 patients who received different gastrointestinal surgery and fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for systemic inflammatory response syndrome between 2006 and 2008 at Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital were included. Patients were analyzed for preoperative physiologic status, surgical stress parameters, and postoperative status of systemic inflammatory response syndrome, complications, and end-organ dysfunction.
Results: Duration of systemic inflammatory response syndrome or positive criteria's number of systemic inflammatory response syndrome after surgery significantly correlated with surgical stress parameters (blood loss/body weight and operation time). Septic complications and prolongation of systemic inflammatory response syndrome were associated with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and increased mortality.
Conclusions: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is a useful criterion for the recognition of postoperative complications and end-organ dysfunctions. Early recovery from systemic inflammatory response syndrome may arrest the progression of organ dysfunction, thus reducing the mortality.
Keywords: gastrointestinal surgery; multiple organ dysfunction syndrome; systemic inflammatory response syndrome. [PubMed]

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Published
2017-06-28
How to Cite
KOIRALA, Udaya et al. Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome following Gastrointestinal Surgery. Journal of Nepal Medical Association, [S.l.], v. 55, n. 206, june 2017. ISSN 1815-672X. Available at: <http://jnma.com.np/jnma/index.php/jnma/article/view/3144>. Date accessed: 20 aug. 2017.
Section
Original Article