Air due to Glue: Spontaneous Pneumothorax in a Young Adult with Glue Sniffing

  • Deebya Raj Mishra Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, B. P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal
  • Narendra Bhatta Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, B. P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal
  • Bidesh Bista Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, B. P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal
  • Puru Koirala Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, B. P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal
  • Ramhari Ghimire Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, B. P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal

Abstract

Solvent abuse, as inhalant specially, in the form of low cost adhesives like dendrite is common in low income countries among children and the teens. This habit is often a stepping stone to harder drugs. The neurological and neuropsychological effects of solvent abuse are well explored. But the respiratory effects are often overlooked. In this report, we present a case of a 19 year old gentleman, with regular history of sniffing of commercial “glue” compounds. This patient presented with right sided chest pain and chest x-ray showed a right sided pneumothorax. The pulmonary barotrauma, possibly due to increased intra-alveolar pressure, during the sniffing process can lead to alveolar rupture and in turn, pneumothorax. In the absence of other risk factors for Pneumothorax, the link between inhalant abuse and respiratory complications has to be explored in patients with history of such abuse.

Published
2018-04-30
How to Cite
Mishra, D., Bhatta, N., Bista, B., Koirala, P., & Ghimire, R. (2018). Air due to Glue: Spontaneous Pneumothorax in a Young Adult with Glue Sniffing. Journal of Nepal Medical Association, 56(210), 621-624. https://doi.org/10.31729/jnma.3530
Section
Case Reports